Administering the Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)

administering myers briggs tests

Information according to The Meyer-Briggs Foundation Web Site

 

Did our series of articles on the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory interest you? Are you inspired to learn more? You may want to consider becoming an MBTI administrator.

How do I become an MBTI administrator?

Interested individuals can become MBTI administrators one of two ways. Certified practitioners must complete a certification program and receive a passing grade on an exam. Those who wish to administer the test but aren’t committed to obtaining certification can obtain the test materials by holding, at minimum, a master’s degree in a mental health field. This includes psychology, social work, counseling, etc.

What are some of the ethical considerations involved in using the MBTI?

Ethical guidelines for using the instrument include, but are not limited to:

- Presenting results in a non-judgmental way

- Refraining from stereotyping or implying everyone of a certain type acts in a certain manner

- Emphasizing that no certain type is “better” than another

- Distinguishing between facts and anecdotes when explaining results

Ethical guidelines for administering the MBTI include, but are not limited to:

- Ensuring confidentiality

- Ensuring the process is voluntary

- Using results from the entire test, without taking a few questions here and there to obtain a “quick reading”

- Providing the test-taker with information about the MBTI and what it is used for

Ethical guidelines for feedback to the test-taker include, but are not limited to:

- Providing results directly, rather than via email

- Allow the test-taker to self-assess preferences prior to obtaining test results

- Emphasizing that the test is representative of a working hypothesis, while the test-taker is the ultimate authority

- Refraining from counseling the test-taker towards or away from a particular career based upon the results

In what settings might MBTI administration be useful?

The MBTI can be used in any setting that has as its mission increased self-understanding. Psychiatrists, psychologists, counselors, social workers, career counselors and other mental health professionals may employ the MBTI with their patients. On a more organizational scale, HR departments and consulting firms may also find the MBTI beneficial. Those teaching high school, undergraduate, or graduate classes on organizational psychology or personality tests may wish to administer the MBTI to their students as a learning tool.

Where can I learn more about becoming an MBTI administrator?

Visit www.myersbriggs.org for more information, as well as a listing of MBTI-certified professionals in your area.

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