United States Doctorate in Homeland Security National Defense Programs

Doctorate in Homeland Security and National Defense Programs

Doctorate in Homeland Security and National Defense programs combine a range of courses covering intelligence operations, homeland security and effective defense tactics. Students with a developed interest in the current challenges in domestic security might find this field of study captivating and engaging. Graduates from these programs could enhance their careers and possibly pursue job opportunities in the homeland security and national defense field. Moreover, scholars may purse fulfilling careers with federal, state and local government agencies and organizations.

Homeland Security Doctorate Program Information

Skills and Knowledge a National Defense and Homeland Security Program Might Develop

With a Doctorate in Homeland Security and National Defense, graduates may be prepared to pursue a myriad of job posts and opportunities. Students with natural the following natural predispositions or skills may be well suited for possible career opportunities in this field. However, these top tier programs might also offer the opportunity for students to develop some or all of these skill and knowledge sets:

  • Legal regulations: When involved in safety and intelligence missions, national defense professionals must protect the country and its citizens without violating the rights of affected by the operation. This includes offering non-citizens and citizens all legal process and rights they are entitled to[i][ii].
  • Media and communications management: In homeland security posts, degree recipients may use various forms of media and methods of communication to inform colleagues, subordinates and the public. These professionals often seek to do so without causing undue alarm, which may require certain finesse[iii].
  • Excellent communication skills: Because national defense agents frequently communicate in a variety of means, homeland security professionals may need to be highly proficient with written, verbal and electronic communications[iii].
  • Critical thinking: Homeland security professionals may be called upon frequently to resolve important and complex national defense issues. The agent might need to synthesize multiple pieces of information to arrive at a single solution for multiple problems[iv].
  • Decision-making: Depending on the position, graduates may be asked to make important and quick decisions in the career or post they pursue. Scholars must remain calm in the moment and continue to make sound judgment calls[v].

Pursuing Career Opportunities With a Doctorate in Homeland Security and National Defense Degree

When students graduate with a Doctorate in Homeland Security and National Defense, they may have the opportunity to pursue a career with a range of federal, state, local and private security employers. Within the United States Department of Homeland Security alone, scholars may choose to seek employment with[vi]:

  • Citizenship and Immigration Services
  • Science and Technology Directorate
  • U.S. Secret Service
  • Federal Law Enforcement Training center
  • Customs and Border Patrol
  • Secretarial Offices
  • Federal Emergency Management Agency
  • Immigration and Customs Enforcement
  • Transportation and Security Administration
  • Information Analysis and Infrastructure Protection Directorate

From information security to law enforcement, national defense doctorate recipients may choose to pursue a broad spectrum of careers and specializations. In fact, cyber security is one of the fastest growing security sectors and may only get more nuanced as the Internet and related technologies continue to advance[vi].

Common Field Tools and Technology for Ph. D National Defense Graduates

In the national defense field, the exact equipment a professional might use may vary with his or her position in the homeland security network. Bomb detectors and intelligence analysts may have some overlap in their software systems, but as far as day-to-day tools, their standard equipment could be extremely different. Across the board, graduates in various possible homeland security posts may encounter some or all of the following tools and technology:

  • Database interfaces[ii]
  • Analytical software[ii]
  • Photo imaging software[ii]
  • Protective wear for hazardous materials[i]
  • Map creation software[i]
  • X-ray equipment[iv]
  • Detectors for weapons and explosives[iv]
  • Security control systems[v]
  • Project management software[v]
  • Teleconference and videoconference systems[v]
  • Virus protection programs[vii]
  • Closed circuit TV systems[vii]
  • Virtual private networks[vii]
  • Network monitoring systems[vii]

Job Outlook for Homeland Security Ph.D. Recipients

After earning a degree, graduates may choose to pursue an emergency management position with local/state governments or hospitals. In 2004, there were 10,880 emergency management specialists in the country and projections indicate this particular niche will grow faster than the national average for all occupations, which translates to the addition of 2,300 jobs[vi]

Analytical chemists might also be the product of a Ph.D. in national defense and in 2004, there were 78,300 of them employed in the United States[vi]. Like emergency management specialists, their projected growth exceeds the national average[vi]. Furthermore, border patrol agents are required to retire at the age of 57, which indicates good job prospects for graduates interested in pursuing a career with this organization[vi]. As of March, there were 11,400 employed border patrol agents[vi] Most of these positions are available in California, Texas, Arizona and New Mexico, but other states may carry open positions as well[vi].


Sources: [i] onetonline.org/link/summary/11-9161.00 | [ii] onetonline.org/link/summary/33-3021.06 } [iii] onetonline.org/link/summary/33-3021.06 | [iv] onetonline.org/link/summary/33-9093.00 | [v] onetonline.org/link/summary/11-9199.07 | [vi] bls.gov/careeroutlook/2006/summer/art01.pdf | [vii] onetonline.org/link/summary/13-1199.02

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